Harry and Jeanette WeinbergThe Foundation as we know it today has existed since 1990, when Harry Weinberg died, a year after his beloved wife, Jeanette, passed away. Today, the fortune that Harry amassed has grown to $2.9 billion—the assets that make possible the Weinberg Foundation’s grantmaking.

In 2020, the Foundation celebrates 30 years of giving, as well as its relationships with the many wonderful grantees and partners throughout the years whose work supports people experiencing poverty.

We invite you to click on the content below, providing a brief, visual overview of the Foundation’s leadership since 1990, as well as significant organizational milestones.

Foundation Leadership 1990-today

The Weinberg Foundation’s Board of Directors consists of five Trustees. From 1990 until 2016, Harry Weinberg (in his Charter) named all Trustees and successor Trustees.

Former Weinberg Foundation Trustees
Bernie Siegel*President
1990-2005
William Weinberg*1990-1994
Nathan Weinberg*1990-2002
Robert T. Kelly, Sr.1990-2002
Alvin Awaya1990-2018
Shale StillerPresident
2005-2010
Tim Kelly2002-2006
Donn Weinberg2002-2018
Barry Schloss*2005-2017
Ellen Heller2010-2016

*Deceased

Current Weinberg Foundation Trustees
Fay Hartog Levin
Ambassador Fay Hartog-Levin (Ret.)Board Chair & Trustee
Effective May 16, 2016
Robert T. Kelly, Jr.
Robert T. Kelly, Jr.Effective July 12, 2006
Paula B. Pretlow
Paula B. PretlowEffective January 1, 2018
Gordon Berlin
Gordon BerlinEffective December 1, 2018
Nimrod GoorEffective July 29, 2019

Foundation Timeline 1990-today

30th Timeline

1990

1990

  • Harry Weinberg dies November 4, 1990.
  • The Foundation as we know it today is created.
  • Foundation total assets are $640 million with an IRS-required distribution of $29,231,956 (today, those numbers have grown to $2.9 billion and more than $130 million respectively).
1990

1990-2005

  • More than $920 million in grants approved, including $590 million supporting the Jewish community, $240 million to Maryland organizations, $200 million to Hawaiʻi organizations, and $150 million to support programs and projects in Israel.
1991

1991

  • IRS-required distribution: $33,256,515
1992

1992

  • IRS-required distribution: $37,952,768
1993

1993

  • IRS-required distribution: $44,477,077
1994

1994

  • IRS-required distribution: $46,056,684
1995

1995

  • IRS-required distribution: $49,942,964
1996

1996

  • Construction of Weinberg Baltimore headquarters building.
  • IRS-required distribution: $56,336,568
1997

1997

  • IRS-required distribution: $65,202,722
1998

1998

  • IRS-required distribution: $89,786,256
1999

1999

  • IRS-required distribution: $96,700,943
2000

2000

  • IRS-required distribution: $100,779,213
2001

2001

  • IRS-required distribution: $94,126,997
2002

2002

  • IRS-required distribution: $92,770,587
2003

2003

  • IRS-required distribution: $92,298,565
2004

2004

  • IRS-required distribution: $93,969,766
2005

2005

  • Rachel Garbow Monroe is hired as Chief Operations Officer (COO) (assumes role as President & CEO in 2010).
  • Foundation staff in both Baltimore and Hawaiʻi offices: 41 (including 22 in Baltimore compared to 40 in 2020).
  • Grants budget, including roughly 15 funding categories, is created as well as program team consisting of two program directors (today, program staff has grown to 14).
  • Foundation celebrates distribution of $950 million in charitable giving since 1990 (today, that total has grown to $2.4 billion).
  • First Annual Community Gathering is held with approximately 75 community and nonprofit leaders in attendance (more than 1,000 people attend today’s Community Gatherings)
  • IRS-required distribution: $98,460,198
2006

2006

  • Robert T. Kelly, Jr. becomes a trustee.
  • IRS-required distribution: $104,226,171
2007

2007

  • While the Jewish community of Baltimore began sponsoring the annual Israel Mission in 1981, and the Foundation began funding the annual Israel Mission in 2001, it was not until 2007 that the Foundation began solely running and leading the Mission.
  • Foundation hosts Baltimore’s first Employee Giving Program.
  • Foundation launches the Small Grants Program (initially the Maryland Small Grants Program), which provides up to $100,000 over two years to small, qualifying nonprofits.
  • IRS-required distribution: $113,429,613
2008

2008

2009

2009

  • IRS-required distribution: $97,625,539
2010

2010

  • Rachel Garbow Monroe assumes role as President & CEO.
  • Foundation staff in both Baltimore and Hawaiʻi offices: 36 (including 19 in Baltimore).
  • IRS-required distribution: $95,947, 274
2011

2011

  • Nearly 30 people participate in Foundation’s first Israel Mission Alumni trip. Several former Mission participants accept the invitation to return to Israel, many bringing a guest, largely at their own expense.
  • IRS-required distribution: $98,899,051
2012

2012

  • Library Project is officially launched, with Foundation committing $10 million to this multi-year, collaborative effort to build or transform up to 24 Baltimore City Public School libraries in selected elementary and middle schools where existing funds can be leveraged.
  • IRS-required distribution: $98,749,250
2013

2013

  • IRS-required distribution: $98,964,847
2014

2014

  • Internal investment team is launched and begins all asset management. Team initially employs a chief investment officer (CIO) and managing director of investments.
  • IRS-required distribution: $95,530,819
2015

2015

  • Foundation staff in both Baltimore and Hawaiʻi offices grows to 46 (including 29 in Baltimore).
  • External investment professionals are added for the first time to serve on the Investment Advisory Committee (IAC), providing additional expertise in real estate and investment management.
  • In addition to national funding, grants are focused primarily within four geographic areas: Baltimore, Hawaiʻi, Northeastern Pennsylvania, and Israel and include more than 40 funding categories (blending populations served and issues).
  • IRS-required distribution: $99,242,009
2016

2016

  • Ambassador Fay Hartog-Levin (Ret.) becomes first trustee chosen by the current board rather than being named in the Foundation’s charter, which was authored by Harry Weinberg before his death in 1990.
  • IRS-required distribution: $103,507,427
2017

2017

  • The Weinberg Foundation joins $12 million partnership to expand the Housing Upgrades to Benefit Seniors (HUBS) program, an initiative that enables older adult homeowners in Baltimore City to remain independent by providing home modifications and repairs, as well as wraparound services.
  • IRS-required distribution: $102,809,887
2018

2018

  • Seven areas of giving, and more than 40 funding categories (blending populations and issues) are consolidated into five core focus areas: Housing, Health, Jobs, Education, and Community Services. These focus areas include a total of 14 clear and distinct funding priorities—advancing the goal of being more strategic and data-driven.
  • Geographic focus includes eight priority communities: Baltimore, Chicago, Hawaiʻi, Israel, New York City, Northeastern Pennsylvania, San Francisco, and Rural Communities (primarily rural areas within proximity to other priority communities). Foundation funding extends to the greater metropolitan areas of the specific cities listed. The Foundation administers the majority of its funding within these communities.
  • Foundation decides to host major events such as the Community Gathering every two years, rather than every year, with the goal of dedicating more funds to grants rather than expenses.
  • Paula B. Pretlow becomes a trustee.
  • Gordon Berlin becomes a trustee.
  • IRS-required distribution: $137,349,969
2019

2019

  • Nimrod Goor is named as the Foundation’s first ever Israeli trustee.
  • Foundation staff, including both Baltimore and Hawaiʻi offices, grows to 56 (compared to a total of 22 in 2005).
  • Foundation hosts National Convening on Jewish Poverty.
  • IRS-required distribution: $136,048,488
2020

2020

  • Foundation staff in both Baltimore and Hawaiʻi offices grows to 57 (including 40 in Baltimore compared to 22 in 2005).
  • Foundation issues statement supporting national calls to move forward together in pursuit of racial justice and equity.
  • Foundation commits $10.5 million to COVID-19 emergency funding within all of its priority communities.